The Fat Man Donates 7 More Boxes

George “The Fat Man” Sanger made his second donation, which included documents and audio recordings from his time before videogames, to the archive. Most interestingly, many of the materials from this donation document the Fat Man’s transition from a more traditional musician to a musician who could manipulate sound through then-emergent MIDI technology, a transition that served him well as he began creating compositions intended for playback on computers and game consoles.

Elsewhere, his donations so far have included an ultra-rare copy of a test cartridge for the ill-fatedĀ Son of M.U.L.E., detailed plans for a state-of-the-art studio home for Sanger and Team Fat (the studio was never built), press clippings of the Fat Man in magazines and newspapers, a collection of game audio demos, audio CDs submitted to his GamePlay Music project, an “Emu” egg given to Sanger by Chris Crawford, and a handful of game audio books and videogames.

Copy of Son of M.U.L.E., donated by George Sanger and now part of the Sanger (George) Papers, UT Videogame Archive. Notice the EA logo in the yellow inset, top left.
Copy of Son of M.U.L.E., donated by George Sanger and now part of the Sanger (George) Papers, UT Videogame Archive. Notice the EA logo in the yellow inset, top left.

Perhaps most interesting from his pre-game days is a collection of open reel audio tapes, some of which Sanger (before the Fat Man persona was born) produced as part of his “Reel Mobile” business venture. Reel Mobile offered a mobile reel-to-reel recording studio for the greater Los Angeles area, and, along with the tapes themselves, Sanger donated clippings of Reel Mobile advertisements placed in local publications and promotional photographs featuring Sanger, cigar in hand, posing next to his stack of mobile recording equipment.

We can only wonder what the Fat Man will donate next. Whatever it will be, we’re always looking forward to our next trip to Fat Studios.