Students Present Projects from Archive

On April 30, two groups of three students each gave presentations on projects they had conducted over the past semester. The projects involved archiving and insuring the preservation of digital audio files in George Sanger’s papers, now housed at the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History as part of the UT Videogame Archive. To everyone’s great delight, Sanger was able to attend the student presentations. I picked him up from his studio in North Austin and accompanied him to the School of Information, where the students are pursuing graduate degrees in archives and information science, and where the presentations would take place.

Both groups gave impressive presentations. The first group, which included Robert Gates, Paul Stenis, and Megan Jorgeson, presented their work on archiving files Sanger had collected in his leadership capacity for the GDC Game Demo Music Marathon sessions in 1998 and 1999. The second group, comprised of Amy Armstrong, Caitlin Murray, and Martha Horan, presented their work on audio files from Sanger’s GamePlay Music project. Both groups ingested the files from Sanger’s collection into a digital repository maintained by the School of Information.

The School employs DSpace as their particular repository architecture. Those interested in the projects can view some of the students’ work (though not the actual audio files themselves) at the School’s DSpace repository, where a series for George Sanger has been established. The students’ own reports on the projects are also available there.

Screen-shot of George Sanger Papers homepage at the School of Information's DSpace digital repository. The numbers in brackets near the bottom of the page indicate the number of files preserved in each series.
Screen-shot of George Sanger Papers homepage at the School of Information's DSpace digital repository. The numbers in brackets near the bottom of the page indicate the number of files preserved in each series.

After the presentations were finished, Sanger distributed party favors, which included posters and flyers that were used in the promotion of GamePlay Music, to the entire class. The poster featured a portrait of the Fat Man that was used in one of the portrait galleries in The 7th Guest, a game for which Sanger composed the music.

Sanger also made sure to thank the students for their hard work and professionalism, especially their careful attention to privacy and IP concerns (n.b., that careful attention is why you won’t be able to access the audio files on the school’s digital repository). The Briscoe Center would like to publicly thank the students as well, because their hard work will play a major role in ensuring that Sanger’s digital materials, along with all the digital materials in the UT Videogame Archive, are preserved and accessible in the future.