Digitized Tidbits

With our focus on building the archive and promptly processing the donations we acquire, it is hard to make time for digitization and web access. But with the little spare time and the help of students from UT’s School of Information, we have managed to digitize several items. And now that these items are available online, we wanted to highlight them here.

Fax from Electronic Arts providing feedback for the first sketches Team Fat produced for the game Jane's Combat Simulations: Advanced Tactical Fighters, George Sanger Papers, e_gs_0058_01.

First, in 2009, a student group scanned a series of documents from George Sanger’s papers related to his work on Jane’s Combat Simulations: Advanced Tactical Fighters and Putt-Putt Saves the Zoo. Sanger stored the documents with the sound recordings he produced for these games, so their full meaning and significance is somewhat lost when divorced from those recordings, but they hold interest by themselves as well. In particular, they provide a glimpse into the relationship between Sanger and his clients Electronic Arts (Advanced Tactical Fighters) and Humongous Entertainment (Putt-Putt).

All of the items digitized from Sanger’s papers can be found here.

Secondly, we have recently made a few videos available online from the Warren Spector Papers. The VHS tapes contain demos and promotional clips for games produced by Origin Systems during Spector’s time there. One of the promotional clips, titled “Origin Systems: Works-In-Progress” features Spector talking about System Shock and Wings of Glory, Richard Garriott on Ultima VIII, and Ken Demarest on Bioforge.

Frame of a narrated video demo of Origin games scheduled for a Spring 1990 release, Warren Spector Papers, dv_00021.

The five videos currently available from Spector’s papers can be found on the Briscoe Center’s Rich Media website. The site allows for indexing and table of contents, which makes accessing the videos more user-friendly.

We intend for these items to be a few in a long series of digitized content from the UT Videogame Archive made available online.  As more become available, we’ll be sure to post updates here.