Category Archives: Events

Upcoming events on Digital Scholarship and Human Rights in the Americas

Join HRDI staff to kick-off LLILAS Benson’s “Digital Scholarship in the Americas” series with two events led by guest speaker Professor Angelina Snodgrass Godoy, University of Washington. Professor Godoy will first offer a workshop “Addressing Human Rights Digitally—Ethical Dilemmas and Possibilities,” looking at the promises and pitfalls of sharing sensitive human rights records through digital platforms. This workshop will be held from 1:00PM – 2:00PM on Monday, September 26, 2016 in the 2nd Floor Conference Room of the Benson Latin American Collection, SRH Unit 1.

Professor Godoy will additionally present “Digital Archaeology: Tools for Truth and Justice in the Wake of El Salvador’s Amnesty Law,” to discuss the amnesty law in El Salvador and examine the possible role of digital archaeology in the pursuit of truth and justice there. This talk will begin at 4:00PM on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 in September 26, 2016 in the 2nd Floor Conference Room of the Benson Latin American Collection, SRH Unit 1.

Both events with Professor Godoy are free and open to the public. For information on the workshop and presentation, contact Albert Palacios and Paloma Diaz, respectively.

 

Background:

Professor Godoy serves as Helen H. Jackson Endowed Chair in Human Rights and founding Director of the Center for Human Rights. Prior to pursuing her doctorate, she worked at Amnesty International, and she credits her experiences among human rights activists—at Amnesty as well as many other organizations—as the principal inspiration behind her work.  She is the author of two books published by Stanford University Press. The first, Popular Injustice: Violence, Community, and Law in Latin America (2006), examines the phenomena of vigilante justice in the wake of contemporary crime waves, especially in Guatemala. More recently, she authored Of Medicines and Markets: Intellectual Property and Human Rights in the Free Trade Era (2013), a comparative study of the politics around health and trade in Costa Rica, El Salvador, and Guatemala. She has also written numerous articles on these and other topics for both scholarly and general audiences.

Co-sponsored by LLILAS Benson, the Latin America Initiative, and the Bernard and Audre Rapoport Center for Human Rights and Justice of the School of Law.

 

Written by Haian Abdirahman, Mosaic Fellow, Human Rights Documentation Initiative.

Giveaway: Tickets to “The Look of Silence” at Alamo Drafthouse, August 14-20

Be one of the first five people to correctly answer the Human Rights Documentation Initiative trivia question to win 2 tickets for a screening of The Look of Silence between August 14-20 at Alamo Drafthouse South Lamar. Winners will be notified by email and tickets will be held at the Alamo Drafthouse South Lamar box office.

About the film:
“The Look of Silence is Joshua Oppenheimer’s powerful companion piece to the Oscar®-nominated The Act Of Killing. Through Oppenheimer’s footage of perpetrators of the 1965 Indonesian genocide, a family of survivors discovers how their son was murdered, as well as the identities of the killers. The documentary focuses on the youngest son, an optometrist named Adi, who decides to break the suffocating spell of submission and terror by doing something unimaginable in a society where the murderers remain in power: he confronts the men who killed his brother and, while testing their eyesight, asks them to accept responsibility for their actions. This unprecedented film initiates and bears witness to the collapse of fifty years of silence.”

Trivia question:  What is one collection in the Human Rights Documentation Initiative archive that deals with the issue of genocide? Hint: Browse collections at http://lib.utexas.edu/hrdi/ut_collections.

Enter the giveaway here.

 

Giveaway: Tickets to “The Act of Killing” at Alamo Drafthouse, August 9-15

The Human Rights Documentation Initiative and Alamo Drafthouse Films are giving away one pair of tickets to a screening of The Act of Killing playing at the Alamo Drafthouse from August 9-15.

The Act of Killing, directed by Joshua Oppenheimer and executive produced by Errol Morris (The Fog of War) and Werner Herzog (Grizzly Bear), documents how death squad leaders in Indonesia are celebrated as heroes and challenges them to “reenact their real-life mass-killings in the style of the American movies they love. The hallucinatory result is a cinematic fever dream, an unsettling journey deep into the imaginations of mass-murderers and the shockingly banal regime of corruption and impunity they inhabit.”

For a chance to win tickets, answer the Human Rights Documentation Initiative trivia question by 11:59 pm on Thursday, August 8.

Rethinking Power and Resistance Conference Online Archive Launch

The Human Rights Documentation Initiative is pleased to announce the launch of the online video archive from Rethinking Power & Resistance: Gender and Human Rights from Texas to the Transnational Americas,  an interdisciplinary conference sponsored by the University of Texas at Austin’s Center for Women and Gender Studies, as part of the Embrey Women’s Human Rights Initiative.

Rethinking Power and Resistance brought activists, organizers and scholars together to discuss issues relevant to activism and community organizing, such as; Arts as Advocacy, Pedagogies of Alliance and Resisting Criminalization.  The video archive, produced with the assistance of videographer Andrea Zarate, contains footage of several panel discussions, a radio segment aired on KOOP 91.7 fm’s progressive news program, People United, and a post-conference promotional video.  A few highlights from the collection include:

Women in Hip-Hop Roundtable, featuring artist TooFly and hip-hop artists Yoli Zapata, DJ Trinity, Invincible, and Lah Tere. The Women in Hip-Hop roundtable features activist women participating in an open discussion about how race, sexuality, and gender have intersected to impact and shape their art, in addition to personal stories of how they got involved in art and music and their current activist projects.

Making a Difference discussion with Miss Major, director of the Transgender Intersex Justice Project.  Miss Major is a powerful activist and transgender elder working for transgender and intersex visibility and rights, especially in the prison system.  Miss Major’s talk highlights the oppression faced by transgender women in the Prison System, many of whom are housed according to physical sex instead of of gender identity, which makes them vulnerable to harassment, sexual assault, and exploitation at the hands of other inmates.  Miss Major’s talk is an open, frank discussion of the issues faced by transgender and intersex people both in and outside of the prison industrial complex, espousing a need to view transgender rights as part of the global human rights framework, not as a niche or special interest group.

Rethinking Power and Resistance Promotional video, featuring interviews from conference organizers and attendees, as well as footage from Mama Said Knock You Out 2, a benefit concert for Mamas of Color Rising.   This follow-up video to the conference contains interviews with conference participants, organizers and speakers as well as impressions of the closing concert, Mama Said Knock You Out 2.

Part of the power present in this conference is the participants’ ability to continually share their work and activism through the online video archive.  To view additional videos from the conference, visit the new Rethinking Power and Resistance Conference page at the HRDI Collections website, and the Finding Aid at the Texas Archival Repository online.

To view photos from Mama Said Knock You Out 2, and read TooFly’s writing about her experience at the conference and creating live art during the concert, check out her blog post covering the event.

For those present in Austin, the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies and the Human Rights Documentation Initiative will be hosting a panel discussion celebrating the launch of the new video archive: https://www.facebook.com/events/158825117618238

 

The H(uman)R(ights)DI Guide to SXSW

It’s that time of year when the South by Southwest Festival consumes Austin with a plethora of activity around new media/technology, music, and film. There’s something for everyone, including archivists and activists. Here are some highlights to look out for. We’ll be updating this as SXSW progresses, so check back often! (Last updated: Tuesday, March 15)

Also, Colorlines dropped the HRDI a mention in their guide to SXSW! See their list for more recommendations.

Tuesday, March 15
Interactive

Film

  • 6:00pm: Fambul Tok, the Book (truth and reconciliation in Sierra Leone) book signing at Resistencia Books (1801 S. 1st St.)

Music

  • 8:00pm: Benefit: Mama Said Knock You Out: A Night of Women in Hip Hop at the Historic Victory Grill (1104 E. 11th St.)
    Lineup includes: Las Krudas (queer feminist hip hop from Cuba), Invincible (Detroit), hosted by Tiger Lily (Riders Against the Storm), dj t-kay (dublab / KOOP 91.7 fm). Funds raised will train 20 women of color to become DONA-certified Birth Companions (Doulas).  The four-day training will be made available free of charge to participants in exchange for a commitment to make their services as birth companions available at no cost to other poor women of color in our community.  The Birth Companion Project is one piece of MOCR’s broader campaign to increase access to birthing options for poor women of color in the greater Austin area.
  • 11:00pm: Bituaya at Speakeasy (412 Congress Ave. #D)
    “Bituaya is a result of the socio-political and cultural merges experienced by Venezuela today. All the rhythms of the Afrocaribbean come together to embody the urbanity of Caracan hip-hop, mixed with electronica elements…Having a nexus with Revolutionary Latin America, the world-wide Hip-Hop phenomena, and Venezuela’s own Afro-caribbean influences, Bituaya’s music is a completely unique experience.”

Wednesday, March 16
Film

  • 12:00pm: Fambul Tok at State Theatre (719 Congress Ave.)
    “Victims and perpetrators of Sierra Leone’s brutal civil war come together for the first time in an unprecedented program of tradition-based truth-telling and forgiveness ceremonies. Through reviving their ancient practice of fambul tok (family talk), Sierra Leoneans are building sustainable peace at the grass-roots level — succeeding where the international community’s post-conflict efforts failed. Filled with lessons for the West, this film explores the depths of a culture that believes that true justice lies in redemption and healing for individuals — and that forgiveness is the surest path to restoring dignity and building strong communities.”

Music

Thursday, March 17
Film

  • 12:00pm: Incendiary: The Willingham Case at Rollins Theatre (701 W. Riverside Dr.)
    “In 1991, Cameron Todd Willingham’s three daughters died in a Corsicana, Texas house fire. Tried and convicted for their arson murders, Willingham was executed in February 2004 despite overwhelming expert criticism of the prosecution’s arson evidence. Today, Willingham’s name has become a call for reform in the field of forensics and a rallying cry for the anti-death penalty movement; yet he remains an indisputable “monster” in the eyes of Texas Governor Rick Perry, who ignored the science that could have saved Willingham’s life. Equal parts murder mystery, forensic investigation and political drama, INCENDIARY documents the haunted legacy of a prosecution built on ‘folklore.'”
  • 5:00pm: Fambul Tok at Alamo Drafthouse (1120 S. Lamar Blvd.)
    “Victims and perpetrators of Sierra Leone’s brutal civil war come together for the first time in an unprecedented program of tradition-based truth-telling and forgiveness ceremonies. Through reviving their ancient practice of fambul tok (family talk), Sierra Leoneans are building sustainable peace at the grass-roots level — succeeding where the international community’s post-conflict efforts failed. Filled with lessons for the West, this film explores the depths of a culture that believes that true justice lies in redemption and healing for individuals — and that forgiveness is the surest path to restoring dignity and building strong communities.”
  • 6:15pm: Who Took the Bomp? Le Tigre on Tour at State Theater (719 Congress Ave.)
    ““WHO TOOK THE BOMP? LE TIGRE ON TOUR” is a concert film that follows the infamous feminist electronic band on their international farewell tour. Covering 20 live performances, the film celebrates Le Tigre’s infectious political dance music while examining the sexism and homophobia of the contemporary pop machine.”
  • 7:00pm: END: CIV at MonkeyWrench Books (110 E. North Loop)
    END:CIV examines our culture’s addiction to systematic violence and environmental exploitation, and probes the resulting epidemic of poisoned landscapes and shell-shocked nations.”

Music

  • 1:00-5:00pm: The People’s Party / Fiesta Popular at MonkeyWrench Books (110 E. North Loop)
    Two day festival featuring hip hop and music that speaks of resistance. Lineup includes: Rebel Diaz, Las Krudas, Riders Against the Storm, One Be Lo, Gabi, The Cipher, and more.

Friday, March 18
Film

  • 7:00pm: END: CIV at Resistencia Books (1801 S. 1st St.)
    END:CIV examines our culture’s addiction to systematic violence and environmental exploitation, and probes the resulting epidemic of poisoned landscapes and shell-shocked nations.”

Music

  • 1:00-6:00pm: Books and Bands at MonkeyWrench Books (110 E. North Loop)
    Lineup includes Matt Bauer, Dana Falconberry, Redding Hunter, and more. RSVP on Facebook.

Saturday, March 19
Film

  • 2:30pm: Who Took the Bomp? Le Tigre on Tour at Vimeo Theater (501 E. 4th St.)
    ““WHO TOOK THE BOMP? LE TIGRE ON TOUR” is a concert film that follows the infamous feminist electronic band on their international farewell tour. Covering 20 live performances, the film celebrates Le Tigre’s infectious political dance music while examining the sexism and homophobia of the contemporary pop machine.”
  • 5:30pm: Incendiary: The Willingham Case at Rollins Theatre (701 W. Riverside Dr.)
    “In 1991, Cameron Todd Willingham’s three daughters died in a Corsicana, Texas house fire. Tried and convicted for their arson murders, Willingham was executed in February 2004 despite overwhelming expert criticism of the prosecution’s arson evidence. Today, Willingham’s name has become a call for reform in the field of forensics and a rallying cry for the anti-death penalty movement; yet he remains an indisputable “monster” in the eyes of Texas Governor Rick Perry, who ignored the science that could have saved Willingham’s life. Equal parts murder mystery, forensic investigation and political drama, INCENDIARY documents the haunted legacy of a prosecution built on ‘folklore.'”

Music

  • 12:00am: Bituaya at Copa (217 Congress Ave.)
    “Bituaya is a result of the socio-political and cultural merges experienced by Venezuela today. All the rhythms of the Afrocaribbean come together to embody the urbanity of Caracan hip-hop, mixed with electronica elements…Having a nexus with Revolutionary Latin America, the world-wide Hip-Hop phenomena, and Venezuela’s own Afro-caribbean influences, Bituaya’s music is a completely unique experience.”

Sunday, March 20
Music

  • 12:00-4:00pm: Benefit: Fire for the People at Workers Defense Project (5604 Manor Rd.)
    Line up includes Rebel Diaz, YC the Cynic, C Rays Walz, The Reminders, Scheme, and more. Funds raised will go towards Workers Defense Project programming which helps win back wages, pushes for better safety conditions for workers, and creates systemic change that empowers the whole community.

Past

Friday, March 11
Interactive

Saturday, March 12
Interactive

Sunday, March 13
Interactive

Film

  • 6:00pm: Party to launch funding for ACT UP! (Aids Coalition to Unleash Power) documentary with directors Scott Robbe, Ellen Spiro and Executive Producer Gus Van Sant

Monday, March 14
Interactive

Film

  • 1:15pm: Fambul Tok at Alamo Ritz (320 E. 6th St.)
    “Victims and perpetrators of Sierra Leone’s brutal civil war come together for the first time in an unprecedented program of tradition-based truth-telling and forgiveness ceremonies. Through reviving their ancient practice of fambul tok (family talk), Sierra Leoneans are building sustainable peace at the grass-roots level — succeeding where the international community’s post-conflict efforts failed. Filled with lessons for the West, this film explores the depths of a culture that believes that true justice lies in redemption and healing for individuals — and that forgiveness is the surest path to restoring dignity and building strong communities.”