Breaking Down Barriers panel discussion

Please join us on Thursday, April 13, 2017 at 1:00pm in the Perry-Castañeda Library for a panel discussion about providing access to information – including disability access, open access to material, web accessibility, and post-custodial access.

Event poster

You can register for the event through UT Learn to reserve your seat, but registration is not required to attend. Login to utlearn.utexas.edu and search for “barriers”.

COERLL Open Education Week event

The Center for Open Educational Resources and Language Learning (COERLL) is hosting a webinar during Open Education Week (March 27th-31st). The webinar, Going Open in the Language Classroom, features speakers from the Parkway School District and George Mason University. The speakers will discuss the challenges and benefits of working together to create new, open materials for their students.

When:
Wednesday, March 29th, 2017 at 15:00 CDT

Presenters:
Megan Schacht, Parkway School District
Sonia Balasch, George Mason University
Alexia Vikis, George Mason University
Lisa Rabin, George Mason University
Colleen Sweet, George Mason University
Carl Blyth, COERLL

Registration

For more information, please see the COERLL website.

Brown Bag Discussion: Misinformation & Fake News

UT Libraries and the Student Association of the School of Information (SASI) co-hosted a brown bag discussion on February 17 to talk about the challenges posed by misinformation, fake news, and the abundance of information (both popular and scholarly). We had a lively discussion with more than twenty attendees from the library, the iSchool, and faculty and staff from across the university!

Participants all read the same article from The Scholarly Kitchen, the blog of The Society for Scholarly Publishing, in advance of the discussion.

Anderson, Kent. (2016, Nov. 17). How’s That “Abundance” Thing Working Out For You?. The Scholarly Kitchen.

More information on the discussion prompts and additional suggested reading can be found in the announcement post.

Our discussion yielded more questions than answers on this complex topic. A common theme that surfaced in small group conversations was the blurring of lines between entertainment and news as the media industry monetizes their business in new ways. Developing information literacy skills, such as source evaluation, is perhaps more critical now than ever– but whose responsibility is it to teach these skills? Most people won’t have the opportunity to attend a higher education institution where research skills like these are taught and practiced.

With so many librarians in the room, we also discussed the responsibility that is choosing what libraries collect and whose voices to privilege as authorities or “experts.” We also noted that there seems to be a backlash against the idea of expertise as elitism. What constitutes expertise, and who gets to decide on the benchmark for credibility?

We hope to discuss these questions more in future brown bag sessions. Watch this blog for announcements about the next one. We hope to see you there!