Portland Press APC discounts

As a subscriber to Portland Press journals, UT Austin affiliated authors get a discount on the article processing charge (APC) for hybrid open access and full open access journals. The discounts range from 15% to 30% off the APC depending on the journal. Please see the Portland Press website for more details.

Hybrid journals are those that are subscription based, but that will publish individual open access articles for a fee. UT Austin authors should remember that they can usually archive a copy of their article in our online archive, Texas ScholarWorks for free.

 

Short ORCID Update

Some folks may recall the open letter in late 2015/early 2016 calling on publishers to require corresponding authors to use ORCID. That letter now has 27 publisher signatories representing 1500 journals. All the publishers who are requiring ORCID are passing that information along to Crossref, which then asks the author’s permission to automatically update the author’s ORCID record. Integrations like this, that reduce data entry obligations, will continue to make ORCID a more appealing option to researchers.

If you’d like more information about ORCID, I recommend these two resources:

Open Letter Year One Report: https://figshare.com/articles/ORCID_Open_Letter_-_One_Year_On_Report/4828312

ORCID Annual Report: https://figshare.com/articles/ORCID_Annual_Report_2016_pdf/4810213

  • Fun fact – over 1 million people registered for an ORCID last year

Professional development opportunity and stipend from COERLL

The Center for Open Educational Resources and Language Learning (COERLL) is offering a $500 stipend and professional guidance to graduate student language teachers who are interesting in learning how to create open language learning materials.

Students can apply by filling out a project proposal form and submitting it to info@coerll.utexas.edu by May 31st, 2017. The graduate students who are chosen are required to attend a summer workshop at UT Austin, lodging and transportation paid, to develop their lessons.

More information available here.

Breaking Down Barriers panel discussion

Please join us on Thursday, April 13, 2017 at 1:00pm in the Perry-Castañeda Library for a panel discussion about providing access to information – including disability access, open access to material, web accessibility, and post-custodial access.

Event poster

You can register for the event through UT Learn to reserve your seat, but registration is not required to attend. Login to utlearn.utexas.edu and search for “barriers”.

COERLL Open Education Week event

The Center for Open Educational Resources and Language Learning (COERLL) is hosting a webinar during Open Education Week (March 27th-31st). The webinar, Going Open in the Language Classroom, features speakers from the Parkway School District and George Mason University. The speakers will discuss the challenges and benefits of working together to create new, open materials for their students.

When:
Wednesday, March 29th, 2017 at 15:00 CDT

Presenters:
Megan Schacht, Parkway School District
Sonia Balasch, George Mason University
Alexia Vikis, George Mason University
Lisa Rabin, George Mason University
Colleen Sweet, George Mason University
Carl Blyth, COERLL

Registration

For more information, please see the COERLL website.

Brown Bag Discussion: Misinformation & Fake News

UT Libraries and the Student Association of the School of Information (SASI) co-hosted a brown bag discussion on February 17 to talk about the challenges posed by misinformation, fake news, and the abundance of information (both popular and scholarly). We had a lively discussion with more than twenty attendees from the library, the iSchool, and faculty and staff from across the university!

Participants all read the same article from The Scholarly Kitchen, the blog of The Society for Scholarly Publishing, in advance of the discussion.

Anderson, Kent. (2016, Nov. 17). How’s That “Abundance” Thing Working Out For You?. The Scholarly Kitchen.

More information on the discussion prompts and additional suggested reading can be found in the announcement post.

Our discussion yielded more questions than answers on this complex topic. A common theme that surfaced in small group conversations was the blurring of lines between entertainment and news as the media industry monetizes their business in new ways. Developing information literacy skills, such as source evaluation, is perhaps more critical now than ever– but whose responsibility is it to teach these skills? Most people won’t have the opportunity to attend a higher education institution where research skills like these are taught and practiced.

With so many librarians in the room, we also discussed the responsibility that is choosing what libraries collect and whose voices to privilege as authorities or “experts.” We also noted that there seems to be a backlash against the idea of expertise as elitism. What constitutes expertise, and who gets to decide on the benchmark for credibility?

We hope to discuss these questions more in future brown bag sessions. Watch this blog for announcements about the next one. We hope to see you there!

Happy Fair Use Week!

This week is Fair Use Week and UT Libraries is participating by hosting a Copyright & Fair Use workshop on Wednesday and by joining in the online discussion via social media.

If you want to see everything that is happening around the country this week, please see the Association of Research Libraries’ page devoted to Fair Use Week.

What is fair use?

Fair use is the limited use of copyrighted works without needing to ask permission from the copyright owner. There is a ton of nuance in that sentence and fair use requires careful consideration. While it is complicated, it’s one of the most important parts of U.S. copyright law for people who are creating new works by building upon the works of others.

Fair use is happening all around – especially if you are on a college campus.

  • A professor may use small clips from films or television shows to demonstrate or illustrate a point in class
  • A student may use quotes from other authors in order to expand upon an argument in their paper
  • University radio or TV stations may use small clips from press conferences or other events as part of their news reporting
  • An instructor may share an article or selected reading with their class
  • A PhD student may include images or figures in their dissertation
  • A student group may create a parody of a popular show or meme

If this all seems foreign to you, I encourage to come to the workshop tomorrow (Wednesday) about fair use. We’ll discuss the basics of copyright & fair use and have hands-on “is this fair use?” activities.

The Libraries also has a comprehensive resource about copyright in the U.S. There is a subsection on fair use that gives a good overview of what needs to be considered. And I highly recommend you check out the codes of best practices that the Center for Media & Social Impact has collected on their site. While these statements are not legally binding, they are a great resource for investigating fair use in different fields.