Celebrate National Haiku Poetry Day for a chance to a $25 gift certificate to the University Co-op!

From Flickr user eyewashdesign: A. Golden

UPDATE 4/22: Congratulations to our winner Ryan Sanchez (@RESanchez33 on Twitter)!

Thanks to all of the poets who submitted entries through Twitter and the haiku table at the Libraries Fair!  It was an incredibly difficult decision and we wish we had prizes for all of you.

Here’s Ryan’s winning entry, submitted via Twitter:

Stacks of books abound

hours of time spent studying

research aids success

 

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So many great library contests this week in honor of National Library Week and Research Week!

April 17 is National Haiku Poetry Day! Compose a haiku that celebrates libraries and/or research for a chance to win a $25 gift certificate to the University Co-op.

Three ways to share your haiku with us and enter the contest:

1) Post it to our wall on Facebook

2) Post it to Twitter (either the whole poem if it fits or a link to it elsewhere) with the hashtag #utlibhaiku

3) Stop by the Libraries Fair on the PCL Plaza from 11:30-1:30 on Wednesday, April 17 and write it down at the haiku table along with your email address.

A winner will be chosen and notified on Monday, April 22.  By entering, you give us permission to share your entry on this blog and via Facebook and Twitter.

Need some help getting started?  To quote HaikuMaker.com, haiku is “an unrhymed verse form of Japanese origin having three lines containing usually 5, 7, and 5 syllables respectively.”

Here are some library-themed examples, composed by our Science Instruction Librarian, Roxanne Bogucka:

What excites desire
more than the Recent Books shelf
in a library?

Tempting New Books shelf—
destroyer of self-restraint,
wreck my willpower!

Scholarly shamus
and research findings flatfoot—
I, Librarian.

Good luck!

About Meghan

Meghan Sitar has been the Instruction and Outreach Librarian in Library Instruction Services since 2005. In addition to coordinating outreach to undergraduates through the development of events, programs, and social media efforts, Meghan works with faculty to design assignments, exercises, and instruction sessions to integrate information literacy into first-year undergraduate programs on campus.
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