RIOT: Grab bag of conference ideas

I recently attended two different conferences in the Pacific NW, Library Instruction West (LIW) and ARL’s Library Assessment Conference (LAC). I encountered tons of great ideas and inspiring work at both conferences, and was reminded of how intertwined instruction and assessment really are. While I could probably prattle on for way too long about things I’m interested in trying, I chose three ideas to bring to the group for discussion. I had trouble choosing sessions to discuss that fit a particular theme so I just went with a grab bag approach, figuring we can just talk about whatever catches y’all’s attention the most.

1) Rubric Assessment Project at Claremont Colleges Library

Poster
Preprint
Libguide with project info

I saw a presentation on this project at LIW, and have linked to a poster that was presented at LAC. Librarians at Claremont undertook this research project through the Assessment in Action program in order to determine what impact librarian intervention in first-year courses has on IL performance in student work. They assessed student papers produced in First-Year Experience programs (similar to Signature Courses) using a broad IL rubric, and analyzed the results to see if different levels of librarian involvement in the courses impacted student performance. They found that librarians did positively influence student performance in the first three levels of involvement, but a fourth higher level of involvement had no impact.

I think my favorite aspect of this study is how they are using the results to communicate with their constituents, like in this infographic: http://libraries.claremont.edu/informationliteracy/images/FYS_Infographic.jpg. I like the idea of using data to communicate our value on campus.

Questions:

  • What research questions do we have regarding the impact of our instruction?

  • What would be convincing evidence to our faculty?

2) Assessment in Space Designed for Experimentation: The University of Washington Libraries Research Commons

Lauren Ray and Katharine Macy (University of Washington)

See abstract here: http://libraryassessment.org/bm~doc/2014-program-abstracts.pdf

At LAC, I attended a lightning talk on assessing the University of Washington Libraries Research Commons, described in the program abstract as “a space intended to meet collaborative needs, foster interdisciplinary connections and provide a sandbox for innovating and testing new library space designs, service models and programs.” While I was inspired by the way their assessment plan focused on student learning in the space rather than just satisfaction and use, I was also really excited to learn about the programming they do in the space, which is targeted at created interdisciplinary connections between scholars.

Their Scholars’ Studio series (http://commons.lib.washington.edu/scholarsstudio) consists of a series of 5-minute lightning talks delivered by grad students and postdocs doing research on whatever the interdisciplinary theme of the evening is. Example themes include “predictions” and “Pacific Northwest.” The talks are followed by a Q&A and a reception. They also provided students with guidance on distilling their research into a short talk and presenting to an interdisciplinary audience before the event.

The presentation also covered Collaborating with Strangers workshops (http://commons.lib.washington.edu/news-events/colab) in which students, faculty and researchers sign up to connect with one another in 3-minute speed meetings – like speed dating for research. Each session is organized around a particular interdisciplinary topic, such as food research, so that participants can connect with others who have similar interests.

In one-on-one interviews with past graduate student presenters from the Scholars’ Studio series librarians learned that the program helped participants rethink their research and think about how other disciplines would approach what they do, as well as how to be more concise in talking about research. I thought that these were both interesting ideas to consider as we think about ways to include graduate student services in our Learning Commons plans.

Questions:

  • Could we adapt these ideas to fit in our Learning Commons plans?

  • How can we ensure that we assess student and researcher learning in the new spaces and programs we’re designing?

 3) Teaching “Format as Process” in an Era of Web-Scale Discovery

Kevin Seeber (Colorado State University-Pueblo)

Slide deck: http://kevinseeber.com/liw2014.pdf

 In this session at LIW, the presenter focused on how he changed from teaching skills based on database navigation to focusing on teaching publishing processes that lead to different formats of information. He stated that “instruction tied to static interfaces, locations, or appearances is not sustainable” because of rapidly changing developments in the technology and delivery systems. I liked an activity he uses to start instruction sessions in which he gives out cards with different formats on them (scholarly journal article, blog post, etc.) and has students arrange them by least to most editing, research, time to publication, and other attributes and uses that as a launching point for discussion on different formats and their uses. This seems like a nice way to discuss source evaluation, as it gives students skills that last beyond university library-based access to information and sets them up for critical reflection to extend beyond the source and examine funding models and how sources are distributed.

I often find myself trying to spend less time discussing interfaces and the like, and am planning on challenging myself to cut down on time spent doing demos even more this fall. I also thought that this was a good example of the pending new ACRL standards being put into action.

 Questions:

  • What ideas do you have for teaching “Format as Process” and other threshold concepts while still making sure students know how to access the materials in question? How can we work together to develop strategies?

  • Now that we’ve had scoUT for a while, how do you see it affecting (or not) students’ understanding of information formats?

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