OA Week Promotional Materials

We’re getting excited for Open Access Week 2017 and wanted to share some of the posters we’ve created. They are all licensed CC-BY, so go ahead and reuse/remix them!

Sticker Shock
OA and OER
Paying for Articles – Don’t Do It!
Library Haiku

We’re having three activities for OA Week this year.

Tuesday, Oct. 24th, 1:00-3:00pm in CLA
Stop by the CLA main floor, talk to us about ORCID, and get a cookie

Wednesday, Oct. 25th, 12:00-2:00pm in the PCL Lobby
We’ll be having a trivia game event in the lobby. Those who participate will get prizes.

Friday, Oct. 27th, 3:00-4:00 in PCL Learning Lab 1
Data & Donuts – Archiving and Publishing Research Data with the Texas Data Repository

The letters of Dr. Henryk Bronislaw Stenzel now on Texas ScholarWorks

The Stenzel Letters Collection can be found on Texas ScholarWorks right here!

Read more about this important paleontologist below and then check out his letters for more insight to both him and his work. Special thanks to Dawn Comford-Wilcox, Curatorial Assistant at the UT Non-Vertebrate Paleontology Laboratory for this bio and for all here work in putting this collection together.

Biography of Dr. Henryk Bronislaw Stenzel

Dr. Henryk Bronislaw Stenzel, born on February 7, 1899 in Pabianice, Poland, was a paleontologist and stratigrapher whose area of specialty was in studying the Early Cenozoic rocks of the Gulf Coast. In 1918, he attended Schlesische Freidrich Wilhelms University in Breslau, where he majored in paleontology and geology with a minor in physics and mathematics. In 1922, Dr. Stenzel then received his doctorate and was the first student to study the subject of petrofabrics under the supervision of Hans Cloos.

In 1925, Dr. Stenzel took a teaching position at the A & M College of Texas (now known as Texas A & M), where he taught Cenozoic paleontology and stratigraphy. In 1934 he joined the Bureau of Economic Geology at the University of Texas and in 1948, Dr. Stenzel became a Professor of Geology at the University.

Dr. Stenzel became the Chairman of Geology at the University of Houston in 1954. In the 1960s, he was a visiting lecturer at Rice University and a visiting professor of geology at Louisiana State University.

Over the course of his career, Dr. Stenzel had 92 works published on petrology, paleontology and stratigraphy of the Lower Tertiary of the Gulf Coast. His most well known publications include the 1949 work Successful speciation in paleontology: The case of the oysters of the Sellaeformis stock (adaptations of species) and the 1971 work: Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology (Oysters).

Dr. Stenzel corresponded with many people in his profession, as well as students, and those he mentored. His collection of letters and exchanges have been digitized and stored for viewing on Texas ScholarWorks. Each file has a PDF view of the original letter as well as metadata, including keywords and dates of the original correspondence, if noted.

Dr. Stenzel also held positions in several professional organizations. He was a fellow of the Geological Society of America, President of the Society of Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists (1949-1950), President of the Paleontological Society (1955-1956), and Delegate of the United States to the International Geological Congress (1956).

Dr. Stenzel passed away on September 5, 1980 in Houston, Texas.

Resources used:
Harry, H. (1981). Henryk Bronislaw Stenzel, The Nautilus.
Roux, W., Jr. (1965). Dedication to Dr. Henryk B. Stenzel, Transactions of the GCAGS, 15.

Data & Donuts room change

Our first Data & Donuts event was a huge success – we had almost 70 people in attendance! To accommodate larger audiences, we’ve decided to move future Data & Donuts events to larger rooms. We’ll also be ordering more donuts!  With the exception of Sept. 22nd and Oct. 13th, all future Data & Donuts will be in PCL Learning Lab 1. We’ll always post a sign on Learning Lab 4 directing people in case you forget where to go.

TX Student Research Showdown

Are you a UT Austin undergrad doing research? If so, here’s your chance to show everyone why your work is so great. Undergraduate Studies is sponsoring a video and presentation competition for undergraduate researchers. Students in the first round will make two minute videos about their research. In the second and final round, students will give a six minute presentation to a live audience and judges. Prizes for the winners include an iPad and scholarships. Video submissions close on Oct. 10th. More information about this opportunity is available on the UGS website.

80 years of Texas Business Review Available Online with Help from Texas ScholarWorks

Bureau of Business Research announces new access to all articles going back to 1927.

In connection with the celebration of the 90th anniversary of the founding of the Bureau of Business Research (BBR) at The University of Texas at Austin, the Bureau is pleased to announce new digital access to the entire print run of articles published in Texas Business Review (TBR), one of the oldest and most influential business journals in the state.

The Bureau published Texas Business Review (ISSN 0040-4209) from 1927 until 2011, when it was discontinued for financial reasons. TBR articles were designed to turn academic business research into information that could be used by lay business owners and policymakers. TBR contained articles on a wide variety of issues but generally focused, in the last decade of its existence, on topics related to high technology, entrepreneurship, and international trade, especially with Mexico and Latin America.

TBR articles documented changes in the Texas economy over the decades and will be of interest to economic and business historians, students of Texas history, and others interested in the story of Texas.

To explore the Texas Business Review, please visit: http://ic2.utexas.edu/tbr/

Full-text issues of the entire run of TBR are available through Texas ScholarWorks, the digital repository of the UT Austin Libraries.

Colleen Lyon, Scholarly Communications Librarian with University of Texas Libraries, and her team arranged to scan the entire back catalog of TBR as part of the Libraries’ Digital Projects program. Library staff digitized over 13,000 pages to complete the project.