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The letters of Dr. Henryk Bronislaw Stenzel now on Texas ScholarWorks

The Stenzel Letters Collection can be found on Texas ScholarWorks right here!

Read more about this important paleontologist below and then check out his letters for more insight to both him and his work. Special thanks to Dawn Comford-Wilcox, Curatorial Assistant at the UT Non-Vertebrate Paleontology Laboratory for this bio and for all here work in putting this collection together.

Biography of Dr. Henryk Bronislaw Stenzel

Dr. Henryk Bronislaw Stenzel, born on February 7, 1899 in Pabianice, Poland, was a paleontologist and stratigrapher whose area of specialty was in studying the Early Cenozoic rocks of the Gulf Coast. In 1918, he attended Schlesische Freidrich Wilhelms University in Breslau, where he majored in paleontology and geology with a minor in physics and mathematics. In 1922, Dr. Stenzel then received his doctorate and was the first student to study the subject of petrofabrics under the supervision of Hans Cloos.

In 1925, Dr. Stenzel took a teaching position at the A & M College of Texas (now known as Texas A & M), where he taught Cenozoic paleontology and stratigraphy. In 1934 he joined the Bureau of Economic Geology at the University of Texas and in 1948, Dr. Stenzel became a Professor of Geology at the University.

Dr. Stenzel became the Chairman of Geology at the University of Houston in 1954. In the 1960s, he was a visiting lecturer at Rice University and a visiting professor of geology at Louisiana State University.

Over the course of his career, Dr. Stenzel had 92 works published on petrology, paleontology and stratigraphy of the Lower Tertiary of the Gulf Coast. His most well known publications include the 1949 work Successful speciation in paleontology: The case of the oysters of the Sellaeformis stock (adaptations of species) and the 1971 work: Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology (Oysters).

Dr. Stenzel corresponded with many people in his profession, as well as students, and those he mentored. His collection of letters and exchanges have been digitized and stored for viewing on Texas ScholarWorks. Each file has a PDF view of the original letter as well as metadata, including keywords and dates of the original correspondence, if noted.

Dr. Stenzel also held positions in several professional organizations. He was a fellow of the Geological Society of America, President of the Society of Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists (1949-1950), President of the Paleontological Society (1955-1956), and Delegate of the United States to the International Geological Congress (1956).

Dr. Stenzel passed away on September 5, 1980 in Houston, Texas.

Resources used:
Harry, H. (1981). Henryk Bronislaw Stenzel, The Nautilus.
Roux, W., Jr. (1965). Dedication to Dr. Henryk B. Stenzel, Transactions of the GCAGS, 15.

TX Student Research Showdown

Are you a UT Austin undergrad doing research? If so, here’s your chance to show everyone why your work is so great. Undergraduate Studies is sponsoring a video and presentation competition for undergraduate researchers. Students in the first round will make two minute videos about their research. In the second and final round, students will give a six minute presentation to a live audience and judges. Prizes for the winners include an iPad and scholarships. Video submissions close on Oct. 10th. More information about this opportunity is available on the UGS website.

Reminder brown bag lunch discussion about digital badges

Please join us today, Wednesday, July 19th, 12:00-1:00pm in PCL Learning Lab 4 to learn about digital badging. We’ll have several knowledgeable presenters give a very short presentation and we’ll save the second half of the hour for discussion. Here’s our speaker line-up:

  • Victor Baeza, Oklahoma State (via Skype)
  • Cinthya Ippoliti, Oklahoma State (via Skype)
  • Sarah Sweeney, Center for Open Educational Resources & Language Learning (COERLL)
  • Nathalie Steinfeld Childre, COERLL
  • Ken Tothero, Texas Extended Campus

If you don’t really know what digital badges are, or would like to share some suggestions for discussion questions, please see our intro to digital badging document.

UT Austin now using EZID

UT Austin faculty, students, and staff can now request digital object identifiers (DOIs) and Archival Resource Keys (ARKs) for their research products  – articles, datasets, posters, etc. DOIs and ARKs are persistent identifiers that allow you to reliable point other people to your work – improving the research process and making it easier for others to cite you.

Requesting a persistent identifier is easy. Simply email utdr-general@utlists.utexas.edu and request your DOI or ARK. Not sure what you need? We can help with that too!

For more information about persistent identifiers and about EZID please see: http://ezid.cdlib.org/